Binary asteroid IAU announcement telegram

(3523) ARINA
V. Benishek, Belgrade Astronomical Observatory; P. Pravec, Ondrejov
Observatory; M. Husarik, Skalnate Pleso Observatory; A. Marchini,
R. Papini, and F. Salvagio, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Della Terra
e Dell’Ambiente, University of Siena; W. Cooney, Starry Night
Observatory, Columbus, TX, U.S.A.; A. Aznar, Isaac Aznar Observatory,
Alcublas, Valencia, Spain; P. Santos-Sanz, A. Sota, F. J. Aceituno,
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía-CSIC, Granada, Spain, R. Goncalves and R. Durkee, Shed of
Science South Observatory, Pontotoc, TX, U.S.A., report that photometric
observations taken with a 0.35-m telescope at the Sopot Observatory in
Serbia, a 0.61-m telescope at the Skalnate Pleso Observatory, a 0.30-m
telescope at the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Siena,
a 0.23-m telescope at the WBRO Florence Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope
at the Starry Night Observatory, a 0.90-m telescope at the Sierra Nevada
Observatory IAA-CSIC and a 0.50-m telescope at the Shed of
Science South Observatory during Mar. 2-May 16 reveal that minor planet
(3523) is a binary system with an orbital period of 29.26 +/- 0.02 hr.
The primary shows a period of 2.6742 +/- 0.0001 hr and has a lightcurve
amplitude of 0.08 magnitude at solar phases 9-13 degrees, suggesting a
nearly spheroidal shape. Mutual eclipse/occultation events that are
0.06 magnitude deep indicate a lower limit on the secondary-to-primary
mean-diameter ratio of 0.24.

Binary asteroid IAU announcement telegram

(2500) ALASCATTALO
V. Benishek, Belgrade Astronomical Observatory; P. Pravec, Ondrejov
Observatory; F. Pilcher, Organ Mesa Observatory, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.; A.
Marchini, R. Papini, and F. Salvaggio, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Della
Terra e Dell’Ambiente, University of Siena; J. Oey, Blue Mountains
Observatory, Leura, NSW, Australia; D. Pray, Sugarloaf Mountain Observatory,
South Deerfield, MA, U.S.A.; R. Durkee, Shed of Science South Observatory,
Pontotoc, TX, U.S.A.; W. Cooney, J. Gross, and D. Terrell, Sonoita Research
Observatory, Sonoita, AZ, U.S.A.; R. Goncalves, Linhaceira Observatory,
Tomar, Portugal; A. Aznar, Isaac Aznar Observatory, Alcublas, Valencia,
Spain; C. Odden, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, U.S.A.; and J. Kemp,
Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT, U.S.A., report that photometric
observations taken with a 0.35-m telescope at the Sopot Observatory in Serbia,
a 0.35-m telescope at the Organ Mesa Observatory, a 0.30-m telescope at the
Astronomical Observatory of the University of Siena, a 0.35-m telescope at the
Blue Mountains Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope at the Sugarloaf Mountain
Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope at the Shed of Science South Observatory, a
0.50-m telescope at the Sonoita Research Observatory, a 0.35-m telescope at
the Linhaceira Observatory, a 0.35-m telescope at the Isaac Aznar Observatory,
and a 0.50-m telescope at the Mittelman Observatories at New Mexico Skies
during Mar. 20-May 19 reveal that minor planet (2500) is a binary system
with an orbital period of 169.1 ± 0.3 hr. The primary shows a period of
2.75123 ± 0.00009 hr and has a lightcurve amplitude of 0.19 magnitude at
solar phases 2-17 degrees, suggesting a nearly spheroidal shape. Mutual
eclipse/occultation events that are 0.15 to 0.27 magnitude deep indicate a
secondary-to-primary mean-diameter ratio of 0.39 ± 0.02.

2020 June 7 (CBET 4791) Daniel W. E. Green [2020-06-08 06:24, Ondrejov]

Binary asteroid IAU announcement telegram

(1480) AUNUS
V. Benishek, Belgrade Astronomical Observatory; P. Pravec, Ondrejov
Observatory; J. Oey, Blue Mountains Observatory, Leura, NSW, Australia;
R. Durkee, Shed of Science South Observatory, Pontotoc, TX, U.S.A.; C. Odden,
Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, U.S.A.; W. Cooney, Starry Night Observatory,
Columbus, TX, U.S.A.; J. Kemp, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT, U.S.A.;
D. Pray, Sugarloaf Mountain Observatory, South Deerfield, MA, U.S.A.; J.
Gross and D. Terrell, Sonoita Research Observatory, Sonoita, AZ, U.S.A.; and
A. Aznar, Isaac Aznar Observatory, Alcublas, Valencia, Spain, report that
photometric observations taken with a 0.35-m telescope at the Sopot
Observatory in Serbia, a 0.35-m telescope at the Blue Mountains Observatory,
a 0.50-m telescope at the Shed of Science South Observatory, a 0.50-m
telescope at the Phillips Academy Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope at the
Starry Night Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope at the Mittelman Observatories
at New Mexico Skies, a 0.50-m telescope at the Sugarloaf Mountain
Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope at the Sonoita Research Observatory, and a
0.35-m telescope at the Isaac Aznar Observatory during Mar. 21-May 19 reveal
that minor planet (1480) is a binary system with an orbital period of 19.714
± 0.003 hr. The primary shows a period of 5.1600 ± 0.0002 hr and has a
lightcurve amplitude of 0.16 magnitude at solar phases 2-18 degrees,
suggesting a nearly spheroidal shape. Mutual eclipse/occultation events that
are 0.09 to 0.20 magnitude deep indicate a lower limit on the secondary-to-
primary mean-diameter ratio of 0.30.

The changing rotational lightcurve of Varuna and evidence for a close-in satelite

From CCD observations carried out with different telescopes, we present short-term photometric measurements of the large trans-Neptunian object Varuna in 10 epochs, spanning around 19 years.

We observe that the amplitude of the rotational light curve has changed considerably during this period of time from 0.41 to 0.55 mag… We propose that these changes in the rotational light-curve shape are due to a large and close-in satellite whose rotation induces the additional periodicity. The peak-to-valley amplitude of this oscillation is in the order of 0.04 mag. We estimate that the satellite orbits Varuna with a period of 11.9819 hr (or 23.9638 hr).

The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 883:L21 (7pp), 2019 September 20 © 2019. The American Astronomical Society.

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Binary asteroid IAU announcement telegram

(2019) VAN ALBADA
V. Benishek, Belgrade Astronomical Observatory; P. Pravec, Ondrejov
Observatory; R. Durkee, Shed of Science South Observatory, Pontotoc, TX,
U.S.A.; M. Husarik, M. Pikler, G, Cervak, and D. Tomko, Skalnate Pleso
Observatory; B. Christmann, Soucieu-en-Jarrest, France; A. Aznar, Isaac
Aznar Observatory, Alcublas, Valencia, Spain; D. Pray, Sugarloaf Mountain
Observatory, South Deerfield, MA, U.S.A.; F. Pilcher, Organ Mesa Observatory,
Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.; V. Chiorny, Kharkiv Observatory; and A. Marchini, R..
Papini, and F. Salvaggio, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Della Terra e
Dell’Ambiente, University of Siena, report that photometric observations
taken with a 0.35-m telescope at the Sopot Observatory in Serbia, a 0.50-m
telescope at the Shed of Science South Observatory, a 0.61-m telescope at
the Skalnate Pleso Observatory, 0.28-m telescope at Soucieu-en-Jarrest, a
0.35-m telescope at the Isaac Aznar Observatory, a 0.50-m telescope at the
Sugarloaf Mountain Observatory, a 0.35-m telescope at the Organ Mesa
Observatory, a 0.70-m telescope at the Chuguev station of the Kharkiv
Observatory in Ukraine, and a 0.30-m telescope at the Astronomical
Observatory of the University of Siena during Sept. 22-Oct. 26 reveal that
minor planet (2019) is a binary system with an orbital period of 17.982 ±
0.003 hr. The primary shows a period of 2.7294 ± 0.0005 hr and has a
lightcurve amplitude of 0.16 magnitude at solar phases 2-3 degrees. Mutual
eclipse/occultation events that are 0.07 to 0.12 magnitude deep indicate a
lower limit on the secondary-to-primary mean-diameter ratio of 0.26.

2019 October 30 (CBET 4689) Daniel W. E. Green